.

Legislature Will Look Into Identity Theft Protection

Taborsak's committee to look into law that will stop collecting private info unnecessarily.

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER PROTECTION

Lawmakers will consider legislation to help safeguard privacy and protect against identify theft.

Next week the General Law Committee, of which state Rep. Joseph Taborsak, a Democrat representing Danbury in the 109th House District is a member, will consider SB 315, proposed legislation that will prohibit the unnecessary collection of social security numbers.

The proposed legislation wouldn’t apply to consumer credit reporting agencies, identity verification measures, medical treatment, law enforcement and job related reasons including employment benefits. However, the language of the bill has yet to define what 'unncessary collection' means. That will be discussed during a public hearing on March 7.

However, under the proposed legislation anyone violating the provisions could be fined up to $500 for a first offense and up to $1,000 for each subsequent offense.

PACKAGE DEAL

As the Nutmeg State prepares to overhaul its , the Connecticut Package Store Association .

Because wrapped in proposed legislation to allow for Sunday liquor sales is a proposal to end a decades-long practice of what some legislators are calling price-fixing. Connecticut uses a price posting system to enforce uniform pricing. Distributors must offer the same price to all retailers and publically post those prices. Distributors can’t offer quantity discounts to retailers. 

“I have to say that except for about five in 200, people are in favor of Sunday sales, but I don’t think people understood this was a package deal,” said state Rep. Kim Rose, a Democrat representing Milford in the 118th House District.

The CPSA represents more than 1,000 of the state’s package stores. It said ending price floors would mean thousands of lost jobs.  The group initially opposed Sunday sales, but overwhelming support caused them to retreat. Instead they worry ending price floors will give chain stores and supermarkets an unfair advantage when purchasing alcohol because they can buy in bulk and sell at steep discounts. Smaller stores won’t be able to compete, they testified in a recent public hearing.

However, rather than legislate a price floor, Rose said it’s up to people whether they will shop at local mom and pop stores or big chain stores.

“There is no other industry where we set prices. We don’t tell people how to price milk,” Rose said.

On another matter, Rose will testify at a public hearing March 6 regarding legislation she introduced to ban the sale of tobacco related products to minors.

The proposed legislation will make it illegal for stores to sell rolling paper and other related products to minors.

TUITION WAIVERS

That many Connecticut service members can’t pay for their children’s higher education bothers state Rep. John Hetherington, a Republican representing New Canaan and Wilton in the 125th House District.

As such, Hetherington wants tuition waivers at state colleges and universities for the children, ages 16 to 23, of those service members who died or became disabled as a direct result of hostile action. It’s an expansion of HB 5296, proposed legislation, which now would only give tuition waivers for veterans and National Guard members to attend Charter Oak College.

“It’s the right thing to do,” Hetherington said. “These service members have given up their futures for us. There is no reason for their children to give up their future.”

Hetherington testified before the Select Committee on Veterans Affairs.

Since 2002 60 Connecticut service members have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. The total number of wounded in Iraq is 235. However, many of those killed or totally disabled had no children, he said. Hetherington used the grim statistics to stress that these benefits wouldn’t pose an undue financial burden to the state or its higher education system.

“Connecticut on the whole has been pretty responsive to its veterans, and who knows we may be ahead of the curve here on this,” he said.

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER PROTECTION

Lawmakers will consider legislation to help safeguard privacy and protect against identify theft.

Next week the General Law Committee, of which state Rep. Joseph Taborsak, a Democrat representing Danbury in the 109th House District is a member, will consider SB 315, proposed legislation that will prohibit the unnecessary collection of social security numbers.

The proposed legislation wouldn’t apply to consumer credit reporting agencies, identity verification measures, medical treatment, law enforcement and job related reasons including employment benefits. However, the language of the bill has yet to define what 'unncessary collection' means. That will be discussed during a public hearing on March 7.

However, under the proposed legislation anyone violating the provisions could be fined up to $500 for a first offense and up to $1,000 for each subsequent offense.

Don Sherman March 06, 2012 at 01:28 AM
Hear! Hear! And as it is our responsibility, we have to take charge of the change and make it happen by finding within our communities those people with the values we cherish and present them to the masses. The two-party system today behaves as one, with the most conservative Republican to the left of a 1950s or 1960s Democrat, and the people referring to themselves as democrats largely skewed toward Marx. If we would get past the labels and acknowledge our differences are at the most basic philosophical level, then we could begin to have a conversation about finding the perhaps 60% in the middle that we agree upon, the low hanging fruit that is a foundation for the new paradigm. It is "we the people" that have to do the work. The party leaders on both sides have vested interests contrary to our best interest.
QWERTY March 06, 2012 at 01:34 AM
I don't disagree with the philosophy, but is this really the case in today's society? I shop at my local liquor store, the rotation of teenage clerks don't seem to know who I am. I understand every circumstance is different but do people purchase alcohol on such a frequent base to become buddy-buddy with the owner/manager/etc?
Claudia Cooper March 06, 2012 at 01:49 PM
Yes, all the businesses, local or otherwise, employ young kids at minimum wage becus it doesn't take rocket science to stand behind a cash register. The sentiment about community is great, but it doesn't logically follow that the presence of big box retailers negatively affects our neighbors' livelihoods. Most of my neighbors have long commutes down to lower Fairfield County already. And the pharmacist at CVS can just as easily recognize my face as Don Bates at Drug Center Pharmacy once did. Now I'm not denying there's a certain pleasure to be had walking into a cozy, family-run hardware store and getting some personalized service as you pet the dog lying on the floor. If money is no object, it's certainly your choice to go there for supplies for your next renovation project. But if money is tight,your husband was laid off or you got a salary freeze or your oldest is headed off to college next year or your septic tank just failed or your property taxes just increased a hundred other possible scenarios, you just might prefer to save some money and go to Home Depot.
Jimmy Pursey March 06, 2012 at 04:46 PM
@Don- "As far as the left being anti-capitalist, the ones I've talked with and observed are anti-capitalist." Haha, you seemed smarter than this, Don. As my post points out, the only "radicalized left" in our current political climate is the imaginary one existing in the minds of marginalized, older white guys. This country could use another 1968, just to remind you people you lost the culture war once already, and we don't want to hear about birth control pills again.
JM March 07, 2012 at 01:59 AM
Don't assume you are saving money at the big box store like Home Depot. the small store is often part of a buying cooperative such as Ace or True Value which has the buying power of thousands of small mom and pop stores behind them. Often the name brand product you are buying at the big store is is a cheaper and less well made version of their regular product, made to meet a price point for the big box store. Also when you go into the big store spending over 2 hours for which should only take 15 mintues and going down 20 aisle looking for screws you end up spending alot more then you planned on. Remember those big stores are not in buisness because you are spending less money.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »